Jenn Manley Lee

Blog

Frontispiece for Dicebox : Book 1 : Wander

First off, that is exactly what I based my design for the Dicebox homepage on, the frontispiece of a book. Here are some examples from books from the 1600s:

Ovid's Metamorphosis The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton

(Click images for larger views.)

Note the pillars in each example; this is a reference to an architectural frontispiece which "constitutes the elements that frame and decorate the main, or front, door to a building; especially when the main entrance is the chief face of the building, rather than being kept behind columns or a portico." (definition courtesy of Wikipedia)Also note the pair of framing figures in iconic clothing surrounded by all sorts of symbolism.

Since Dicebox was started as a way for me to process stories throughout my life and since the earliest way I remembered getting stories that meant something to me was through books, this was a natural choice for the story's homepage. I will be creating a new frontispiece for each book which will then take up their traditional place in the printed collections.

Now for the symbolism.

Obviously much of it relates to Molly and Griffen but all of it is influenced by the particular Book of Dicebox it fronts. This is Wander, the book of Earth and Plants, the Black book, South, Summer and so on. Hence the black background, the idyllic summer landscape with a prominent mountain and so on. (I did make an entry in my Process Journal which illustrates and somewhat explains how I've organized the four Books of Dicebox and why.)

Before I list the symbols that are Molly and Griffen specific, let me emphasize that they are not opposites; they are partners. I paired the symbolism on this page evenly between them in categories, sometimes it's classically opposing aspects, sometimes they are items the same category, and sometimes they are two parts of an equation.

The Pillars

The capitals (or crowns) are Green Men which also form the masks of Comedy and Tragedy. Green Men make repeated appearances throughout the entirety of Dicebox; there have already been three in this first book. (As this dissection of the frontispiece will be lengthy as it is, I will explore why this figure fascinates me in some other time and place.) Molly's Green Man is comprised of Hawthorne, Griffen's is Alder implying all the further symbolism tied up in those trees. The aspects of Comedy and Tragedy aren't really that character specific, they mostly are announcing a story. I made the decision who got which on who seemed unhappier throughout this Book (it was close).

Topping the Green Men are the Moon and a Beetle for Molly and the Sun and a Bee for Griffen. The celestial symbols are due to their essential presence more than any implication of gender roles or primacy. Molly's insect is a beetle because they are associated with secrets and cycles of awareness. The bee is associated with Griffen for its link to speech and thought as well as the ritual uses of honey. (The Sacred Bee by Hilda Ransome will give all the particulars)

The base of the capitals is an egg-and-dart pattern with a kanji symbol in the center. Molly's character is rou, a root of flesh, a carcass cut open; Griffen's is gua, a root of bone, representing a skull and vertebrae. I chose the egg-and-dart pattern because of the variety of interpretations I have heard of its meaning: life and death, male and female, symbol of Aphrodite (to go with the symbol of Hermes of the top bar) and so on.

The symbols contained in square plaque that begins the shaft of the pillar are very character specific. The dominating center symbol represents their place of origin: Molly is from Korsevei, which means crossroads in Norwegian and Griffen is from Aaleth, an arctic-like planet which has an artificially created green space around the equator named the Ouroboros for obvious reasons. The squares in Molly's represent Earth and the triangles in Griffen's are for fire. The symbol in the top left corner of Molly's is an electrical notation of "ground" which pairs with the on in Griffen's upper right representing "fuse." The symbol in the lower right of Molly's is for salt and Griffen is blocking hers for for sulfur.

The base of the pillars are decorated with the mystical representation of each character's celestial object, interspersed with the stage in the poppy's cycle the best aligns with each; Molly is the Bloom, Griffen is the Seeds.

The Objects

I'll start with the "female" and "male" tools: Molly has the broom for all it's association with protection and controlling influence, Griffen has a distaff as she is the storyteller of the two. Likewise Griffen has a saw given her tongue and Molly the hammer as she is the stabilizer.

Molly's coins at her feet and Griffen's blade are nods to where I feel they are in the classic Tarot categories, thought you'll want to refer to this journal entry as to how I place Swords.

The cat and the crow are the common animals that best represent their respective personalities; is they had familiars, it would be these animals.

Molly and Griffen

First off, I should mention that the color red is their color. As to why, let me refer to my response to Dylan when she asked me on the Dicebox Forum:

I've acknowledged to myself ages ago that Dicebox is, beyond being about Molly and Griffen, a call and response to all the stories I grew up with and ever encountered. So I spent some time exploring certain recurring and dominant themes of classic tales and myths, researching them and forming my own response to them. The hell with Joseph Campbell. You won't see most of this directly addressed within Dicebox--it will be often be even more than subtext, more like 3rd sub-basement text. It's the flavor and my personal unifying force.

Naturally I was going to delve into color symbolism--and this was still when I thought Dicebox was going to end up being black & white. Each Book has been assigned a color as well as other forces. And red is first and foremost blood to me.

I don't think it's any secret that I am interested in female energy and roles in stories, along with other border walkers such as tricksters and the like. Repeatedly, blood is aligned with women and border places. Death, birth, the river surrounding Faerie, blood on the snow, blood in the shoe. And then there's the whole idea of blood as guilt by association. Can't trust a woman 'cause they bleed 3 days a month and don't die of it. (This leads me back to the Southpaws thread--female energy is often associated with the left side, the sinister and dark.) And of course the whole Dicebox-->Peorth-->Womb connection.

And, yes, so far in Dicebox Molly and Griffen have worn some scrap of red, be it shirt, pants trim, knee patch or coat lining. And the red will vary from a maroon to a pink---from dried blood to a blood partially rinsed from a white rag.

Now, all that said, this is a standard I am setting up so I can break it at the appropriate time.

They have their own colors as well, represented by the clothing they are wearing. Griffen has white and yellow, representing air and fire, whereas Molly has yellow and black, for fire and earth.

They are both dressed in idealized versions of the outfits they appear in at the beginning of Dicebox, Griffen being the Victorian fop and Molly the hardy rustic traveller. (side note: Molly's boots are based on those on a statue of a priest and soldier somewhere in New York City, somewhere near Time Square. I can't remember who and haven't found it again on subsequent visits. These were to be the boots she wore throughout Dicebox, but, obviously, I changed my mind.)

Pieces of the same puzzle: the candle and the egg, the lock and the key. These have much more to do with how each keeps their secrets and how the other might discover them.

And, finally, Griffen's mouth is open, where as Molly's is shut, an aspect of this pair that will be elaborated on in the page notes of the very first page of Dicebox.